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American Revolutions: A Continental History, 1750-1804 (Hardcover)

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The American Revolution is often portrayed as a high-minded, orderly event whose capstone, the Constitution, provided the ideal framework for a democratic, prosperous nation. Alan Taylor, two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize, gives us a different creation story in this magisterial history of the nation's founding.

Rising out of the continental rivalries of European empires and their native allies, Taylor's Revolution builds like a ground fire overspreading Britain's mainland colonies, fueled by local conditions, destructive, hard to quell. Conflict ignited on the frontier, where settlers clamored to push west into Indian lands against British restrictions, and in the seaboard cities, where commercial elites mobilized riots and boycotts to resist British tax policies. When war erupted, Patriot crowds harassed Loyalists and nonpartisans into compliance with their cause. Brutal guerrilla violence flared all along the frontier from New York to the Carolinas, fed by internal divisions as well as the clash with Britain. Taylor skillfully draws France, Spain, and native powers into a comprehensive narrative of the war that delivers the major battles, generals, and common soldiers with insight and power.

With discord smoldering in the fragile new nation through the 1780s, nationalist leaders such as James Madison and Alexander Hamilton sought to restrain unruly state democracies and consolidate power in a Federal Constitution. Assuming the mantle of "We the People," the advocates of national power ratified the new frame of government. But their opponents prevailed in the presidency of Thomas Jefferson, whose vision of a western "empire of liberty" aligned with the long-standing, expansive ambitions of frontier settlers. White settlement and black slavery spread west, setting the stage for a civil war that nearly destroyed the union created by the founders.

Product Details
ISBN: 9780393082814
ISBN-10: 0393082814
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
Publication Date: September 6th, 2016
Pages: 704
Language: English

Third Monday in May

 

From the publisher:

"In this richly imaginative debut novel, the first running of the Kentucky Derby serves as the backdrop for a story of what might have been had Abraham Lincoln survived his assassination and lived to retire with Mary to Springfield.  Derby historian Ross R. Moore provides an accurate account of the origins of the famous race, while creating a detailed and entirely plausible world through which the Lincoln's journey to Louisville to meet old friends and to face another deadly threat.  Part horse racing saga, part travelogue, part historical fantasy, part suspense thriller, chock full of sly bits of "stealth history" befitting its educator author, and peopled with memorable characters both real and imaginary, the result is an entertaining and engaging yarn and rewarding read."

Ross R. Moore is an educator, storyteller, and singer-songwriter living in San Diego.  A native of Kentucky where he attended Murray State University and the University of Louisville, he was for several years a museum educator at the Kentucky Derby Museum, sharing the history of the race with visitors. Now he brings this story to a wider audience, drawing upon his knowledge of Derby lore to form the backdrop of this, his first novel.

New Novel about Crawfish Bottom

Book cover: Concerning the Matter of the King of Craw a story by Ron Rhody

Local author, Ron Rhody has written a new novel "Concerning the Matter of the King of Craw" about the infamous John Fallis.

Ron is author of the "Theo" books about Frankfort.

Author Ron Rhody and store owner Lizz Taylor

Ron Rhody was in the store to sign copies of his new book recently.

So we have a limited quantity of signed copies of King of Craw that would make great presents.