You are here

The Hideaway (Paperback)

The Hideaway Cover Image
$15.99
Usually Ships in 1-5 Days

Description


"A story both powerful and enchanting: a don't-miss novel in the greatest southern traditions of storytelling." --Patti Callahan Henry, New York Times bestselling author

When her grandmother's will wrenches Sara back home, she learns more about Margaret Van Buren in the wake of her death than she ever knew in life.

After her last remaining family member dies, Sara Jenkins goes home to The Hideaway, her grandmother Mags's ramshackle B&B in Sweet Bay, Alabama. She intends to quickly tie up loose ends then return to her busy life and thriving antique shop in New Orleans. Instead, she learns Mags has willed The Hideaway to her and charged her with renovating it--no small task considering her grandmother's best friends, a motley crew of senior citizens, still live there.

Rather than hurrying back to New Orleans, Sara stays in Sweet Bay and begins the biggest house-rehabbing project of her career. Amid drywall dust, old memories, and a charming contractor, she discovers that slipping back into life at The Hideaway is easier than she expected.

Then she discovers a box Mags left in the attic with clues to a life Sara never imagined for her grandmother. With help from Mags's friends, Sara begins to piece together the mysterious life of bravery, passion, and choices that changed her grandmother's destiny in both marvelous and devastating ways.

When an opportunistic land developer threatens to seize The Hideaway, Sara is forced to make a choice--stay in Sweet Bay and fight for the house and the people she's grown to love or leave again and return to her successful but solitary life in New Orleans.

"Two endearing heroines and their poignant storylines of love lost and found make this the perfect book for an afternoon on the back porch with a glass of sweet tea." --Karen White, New York Times bestselling author

Product Details
ISBN: 9780718084226
ISBN-10: 0718084225
Publisher: Thomas Nelson
Publication Date: April 11th, 2017
Pages: 352
Language: English

New Novel about Crawfish Bottom

Book cover: Concerning the Matter of the King of Craw a story by Ron Rhody

Local author, Ron Rhody has written a new novel "Concerning the Matter of the King of Craw" about the infamous John Fallis.

Ron is author of the "Theo" books about Frankfort.

Author Ron Rhody and store owner Lizz Taylor

Ron Rhody was in the store to sign copies of his new book recently.

So we have a limited quantity of signed copies of King of Craw that would make great presents.

The Sport of Kings

sport of kings cover showing jockey on racing horse

 

Kentucky author C. E. Morgan is drawing a lot of attention with her book "The Sport of Kings."

From the New York Times:

In 1955, Sports Illustrated sent William Faulkner to cover the Kentucky Derby. The article that resulted didn’t have much in common with sports journalism. It was a prose poem, a sensorium. Its thesis statement, which I have located with the aid of bloodhounds, is probably this: “What the horse supplies to man is something deep and profound in his emotional nature and need.”

C. E. Morgan’s ravishing and ambitious new horse-world novel, “The Sport of Kings,” taps into that nature and need. It’s a mud-flecked epic, replete with fertile symbolism, that hurtles through generations of Kentucky history.

On its surface, “The Sport of Kings” has enough incident (arson, incest, a lynching, miscegenation, murder) to sustain a 1980s-era television mini-series. You might title that mini-series “Lexington!” Michael Landon would play a dynastic horse breeder, tanked up on destiny, with a whip in one hand and a mint julep in the other.

But Ms. Morgan is not especially interested in surfaces, or in conventional plot migrations. She’s an interior writer, with deep verbal and intellectual resources. She fills your head with all that exists in hers, and that is quite a lot — she has a special and almost Darwinian interest in consanguinity, in the barbed things that are passed on in the blood of people and of horses, like curses, from generation to generation.

The NewYorker Magazine had this to say:

“The Sport of Kings” hovers between fiction, history, and myth, its characters sometimes like the ancient ones bound to their tales by fate, its horses distant kin to those who drew the chariot of time across the sky. One of Morgan’s remarkable achievements in this novel is to wind all the clocks at once: a mortal one, which stops too soon (“time is a horse you never have to whip”); a historical one, which stops when memory runs down; and a cosmological one, which never stops at all.

Come in an pick a copy to see what the talk is all about.