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Barbecue Bible: Sauces, Rubs and Marinades, Bastes, Butters & Glazes (Paperback)

Barbecue Bible: Sauces, Rubs and Marinades, Bastes, Butters & Glazes Cover Image
$12.95
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Description


Marinate skewers of beef tips in Tex-Mex Tequila-Jalapeno Wet Rub before putting them on the grill. Or slather pork chops with B.B. Lawnside Spicy Apple Barbecue Sauce. Or coax a chicken breast to perfection with a Coconut Curry Baste. From Steven Raichlen, author of the big, bad, definitive BARBECUE BIBLE, comes BARBECUE BIBLE SAUCES, RUBS, AND MARINADES, BASTES, BUTTERS & GLAZES, an in-depth celebration of those cornerstones on which unforgettable live-fire flavors are built.

Here are fiery spice mixtures for massaging into food, sensuous bastes to be brushed on like lacquer, killer marinades, sugary glazes, tangy mops from award-winning barbecue teams, and dozens of sauces, from the classic tomato-based American Sweet and Smoky to a bold Moroccan Charmoula with its medley of fresh herbs and spices.

In all, 200 recipes cover the gamut. But BARBECUE BIBLE SAUCES aims even higher - offering a serious education in flavor. Big flavor. It tells how to use a mortar and pestle to maximize fresh garlic and onions. How to create a failproof fish cure and radically improve home-smoked fish. The best way to handle a Scotch bonnet chili to reap its heat and savor without scorching skin or eyes. How to balance acid, oil, and aromatics in a marinade so that it tenderizes meat, coats the exterior to keep it from drying out during cooking, and adds cannon blasts of flavor. And how to confidently incorporate ingredients like tamarind, lemon grass, star anise, wasabi, marjoram, kaffir lime leaf, and tarragon.

Put it all together, and you'll really have your barbecue mojo working.

Product Details
ISBN: 9780761119791
ISBN-10: 0761119795
Publisher: Workman Publishing
Publication Date: May 2000
Pages: 304
Language: English

New Novel about Crawfish Bottom

Book cover: Concerning the Matter of the King of Craw a story by Ron Rhody

Local author, Ron Rhody has written a new novel "Concerning the Matter of the King of Craw" about the infamous John Fallis.

Ron is author of the "Theo" books about Frankfort.

Author Ron Rhody and store owner Lizz Taylor

Ron Rhody was in the store to sign copies of his new book recently.

So we have a limited quantity of signed copies of King of Craw that would make great presents.

The Sport of Kings

sport of kings cover showing jockey on racing horse

 

Kentucky author C. E. Morgan is drawing a lot of attention with her book "The Sport of Kings."

From the New York Times:

In 1955, Sports Illustrated sent William Faulkner to cover the Kentucky Derby. The article that resulted didn’t have much in common with sports journalism. It was a prose poem, a sensorium. Its thesis statement, which I have located with the aid of bloodhounds, is probably this: “What the horse supplies to man is something deep and profound in his emotional nature and need.”

C. E. Morgan’s ravishing and ambitious new horse-world novel, “The Sport of Kings,” taps into that nature and need. It’s a mud-flecked epic, replete with fertile symbolism, that hurtles through generations of Kentucky history.

On its surface, “The Sport of Kings” has enough incident (arson, incest, a lynching, miscegenation, murder) to sustain a 1980s-era television mini-series. You might title that mini-series “Lexington!” Michael Landon would play a dynastic horse breeder, tanked up on destiny, with a whip in one hand and a mint julep in the other.

But Ms. Morgan is not especially interested in surfaces, or in conventional plot migrations. She’s an interior writer, with deep verbal and intellectual resources. She fills your head with all that exists in hers, and that is quite a lot — she has a special and almost Darwinian interest in consanguinity, in the barbed things that are passed on in the blood of people and of horses, like curses, from generation to generation.

The NewYorker Magazine had this to say:

“The Sport of Kings” hovers between fiction, history, and myth, its characters sometimes like the ancient ones bound to their tales by fate, its horses distant kin to those who drew the chariot of time across the sky. One of Morgan’s remarkable achievements in this novel is to wind all the clocks at once: a mortal one, which stops too soon (“time is a horse you never have to whip”); a historical one, which stops when memory runs down; and a cosmological one, which never stops at all.

Come in an pick a copy to see what the talk is all about.