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The Undoing of Saint Silvanus (Hardcover)

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Exciting fiction premiere from beloved New York Times bestselling author Beth Moore.

Only God knew why Jillian Slater agreed to return to New Orleans on the news that her father had finally drunk himself to death. It's not like they were close. She hadn't seen him--or her grandmother, the ice queen--in almost 20 years. But when Adella Atwater, the manager of her grandmother's apartment house, called and said Jillian's expenses would be paid if she'd fly in for the burial, a free trip to New Orleans was too intriguing to resist.

What Adella didn't tell her was that the apartment house wasn't a house at all and, whatever it was, bore the dead weight of a long and painful history. As soon as Jillian meets the odd assortment of renters and realizes that her grandmother had no idea she was coming, she hatches a plan to escape. But the investigation into her father's death quickly unfolds and Jillian is drawn into the lives of the colorful collection of saints and sinners who pass through Saint Silvanus. She soon discovers there is more at stake than she ever imagined. Who is behind the baffling messages and the strange relics left on the steps? Is it possible that her family is actually cursed? Or is it just this crazy old house that holds them all under its spell?

Jillian walks into a web of spiritual and personal danger borne out of her family's broken history, and despite Adella's wiliest efforts, only God himself can orchestrate the undoing of all that is going on at Saint Silvanus.
Product Details
ISBN: 9781496416476
ISBN-10: 1496416473
Publisher: Tyndale House Publishers
Publication Date: September 20th, 2016
Pages: 480
Language: English

New Novel about Crawfish Bottom

Book cover: Concerning the Matter of the King of Craw a story by Ron Rhody

Local author, Ron Rhody has written a new novel "Concerning the Matter of the King of Craw" about the infamous John Fallis.

Ron is author of the "Theo" books about Frankfort.

Author Ron Rhody and store owner Lizz Taylor

Ron Rhody was in the store to sign copies of his new book recently.

So we have a limited quantity of signed copies of King of Craw that would make great presents.

The Sport of Kings

sport of kings cover showing jockey on racing horse

 

Kentucky author C. E. Morgan is drawing a lot of attention with her book "The Sport of Kings."

From the New York Times:

In 1955, Sports Illustrated sent William Faulkner to cover the Kentucky Derby. The article that resulted didn’t have much in common with sports journalism. It was a prose poem, a sensorium. Its thesis statement, which I have located with the aid of bloodhounds, is probably this: “What the horse supplies to man is something deep and profound in his emotional nature and need.”

C. E. Morgan’s ravishing and ambitious new horse-world novel, “The Sport of Kings,” taps into that nature and need. It’s a mud-flecked epic, replete with fertile symbolism, that hurtles through generations of Kentucky history.

On its surface, “The Sport of Kings” has enough incident (arson, incest, a lynching, miscegenation, murder) to sustain a 1980s-era television mini-series. You might title that mini-series “Lexington!” Michael Landon would play a dynastic horse breeder, tanked up on destiny, with a whip in one hand and a mint julep in the other.

But Ms. Morgan is not especially interested in surfaces, or in conventional plot migrations. She’s an interior writer, with deep verbal and intellectual resources. She fills your head with all that exists in hers, and that is quite a lot — she has a special and almost Darwinian interest in consanguinity, in the barbed things that are passed on in the blood of people and of horses, like curses, from generation to generation.

The NewYorker Magazine had this to say:

“The Sport of Kings” hovers between fiction, history, and myth, its characters sometimes like the ancient ones bound to their tales by fate, its horses distant kin to those who drew the chariot of time across the sky. One of Morgan’s remarkable achievements in this novel is to wind all the clocks at once: a mortal one, which stops too soon (“time is a horse you never have to whip”); a historical one, which stops when memory runs down; and a cosmological one, which never stops at all.

Come in an pick a copy to see what the talk is all about.