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Whole: How I Learned to Fill the Fragments of My Life with Forgiveness, Hope, Strength, and Creativity (Hardcover)

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A five-point plan to usher you through heartache and toward a stronger, healthier place.

I know how to kill someone and get away with it. The words spoken by her father when Melissa was a teen haunt her to this day. Two years later, after confessing that he was the serial killer nationally known as the Happy Face Killer, Keith Jesperson was arrested for the murder of eight women. The pain, guilt, and shame that followed her father's conviction stigmatized Melissa for years until she figured out a way to use her emotions as fuel to free herself from self-imposed limits and set out on a journey to rebuild her fragmented life.

Through her work as an Emmy-nominated investigative journalist, television host, educator, and advocate, Melissa created WHOLE, a five-step program to better develop her own approach to healing: Watch the Storm, Heal Your Heart, Open Your Mind, Leverage Your Power, and Elevate Your Spirit.

Among other things, she found that the commitment to your core values makes all the difference in getting unstuck; that forgiveness gives the greatest chance of making a future not defined by the past; that there is great value in vulnerability; that creativity is essential to living a full life; and that hope is the basis for everything we feel, believe, and do.

In each phase of the program, Melissa inspires you to embrace your past to find wholeness within the parts of your life that you believe to be broken. If you are stuck in the rut of a painful experience whether depression, trauma, pain, fear, addiction, or guilt you will find comfort in this book's advice, self-evaluation, and action plans.

WHOLE is a powerful journey of recovery and awakening that reframes the pain experience so it can be used as a way to invite understanding, growth, and transformation into your life.

About the Author


MELISSA MOORE is an Emmy-nominated television investigative journalist with Warner Brothers Crime Watch Daily and the host of LMN s Monster in My Family. She is an internationally recognized expert and speaker on the topics of trauma recovery, domestic violence, and serial crimes. She is the author of her memoir, Shattered Silence. MICHELE MATRISCIANI is a New York Times bestselling editor, collaborator, and ghostwriter hailing from several trade book publishing houses. She is the founder of Bookchic LLC, a publishing consultation firm."
Product Details
ISBN: 9781623367442
ISBN-10: 1623367441
Publisher: Rodale Books
Publication Date: September 13th, 2016
Pages: 256
Language: English

New Novel about Crawfish Bottom

Book cover: Concerning the Matter of the King of Craw a story by Ron Rhody

Local author, Ron Rhody has written a new novel "Concerning the Matter of the King of Craw" about the infamous John Fallis.

Ron is author of the "Theo" books about Frankfort.

Author Ron Rhody and store owner Lizz Taylor

Ron Rhody was in the store to sign copies of his new book recently.

So we have a limited quantity of signed copies of King of Craw that would make great presents.

The Sport of Kings

sport of kings cover showing jockey on racing horse

 

Kentucky author C. E. Morgan is drawing a lot of attention with her book "The Sport of Kings."

From the New York Times:

In 1955, Sports Illustrated sent William Faulkner to cover the Kentucky Derby. The article that resulted didn’t have much in common with sports journalism. It was a prose poem, a sensorium. Its thesis statement, which I have located with the aid of bloodhounds, is probably this: “What the horse supplies to man is something deep and profound in his emotional nature and need.”

C. E. Morgan’s ravishing and ambitious new horse-world novel, “The Sport of Kings,” taps into that nature and need. It’s a mud-flecked epic, replete with fertile symbolism, that hurtles through generations of Kentucky history.

On its surface, “The Sport of Kings” has enough incident (arson, incest, a lynching, miscegenation, murder) to sustain a 1980s-era television mini-series. You might title that mini-series “Lexington!” Michael Landon would play a dynastic horse breeder, tanked up on destiny, with a whip in one hand and a mint julep in the other.

But Ms. Morgan is not especially interested in surfaces, or in conventional plot migrations. She’s an interior writer, with deep verbal and intellectual resources. She fills your head with all that exists in hers, and that is quite a lot — she has a special and almost Darwinian interest in consanguinity, in the barbed things that are passed on in the blood of people and of horses, like curses, from generation to generation.

The NewYorker Magazine had this to say:

“The Sport of Kings” hovers between fiction, history, and myth, its characters sometimes like the ancient ones bound to their tales by fate, its horses distant kin to those who drew the chariot of time across the sky. One of Morgan’s remarkable achievements in this novel is to wind all the clocks at once: a mortal one, which stops too soon (“time is a horse you never have to whip”); a historical one, which stops when memory runs down; and a cosmological one, which never stops at all.

Come in an pick a copy to see what the talk is all about.